Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

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Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

Post by Tengku Ira on Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:16 pm



Hye members, as i'm responsible in operational so i thought everyone of us can throw up some ideas and share your knowledge or experience to generate this bigger.

This is the link Event Guide

Here is some event guide from Universal Orlando.
Event Guide (Entry-Level)

Job Description
Event Guides assist the Sales and Marketing department in executing internal and external Special Events.
Event Guides act as ambassadors to Event Guests by welcoming them, communicating event flow information and providing overall park directions.

Event Guides responsible for:

Executing Special Events in Universal Studios, Islands Of Adventure, CityWalk, Resort Hotels and Sound Stages.
- Assisting with arrivals and check-in of Event Guests, facilitating movement of groups throughout the resort, providing overall itinerary information and assistance to Special Event Guests (restroom, attraction and bus locations), maintaining boundaries of Event, distributing materials (programs, souvenirs, ponchos, etc.).
- Assisting with on-site needs of Event Guests (Lost and Found, Health Services, etc.), assisting with setting up barricades or rope and stanchion, performing other duties as needed with the Event. The Event Guide must have an overall knowledge of the entire property including on-site hotels.
-Providing assistance during Productions in the park – crowd control, barricade and rope and stanchion placement.
-Providing assistance with directing buses on park property.
-During peak park operation, assisting with Entrance Operations in turnstiles, Guest Services, etc.
-Understanding and actively participating in Environmental, Health & Safety responsibilities by following established Universal Orlando policy, procedures, training and Team Member involvement activities.
-Performing other duties as assigned.

Requirements
To perform the role of an Event Guide successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required.

Consistent attendance is a job requirement.
High school degree or GED preferred.
Must have strong interpersonal skills, the ability to think on your feet and also be able to demonstrate park knowledge (attraction locations and descriptions, restroom locations, etc.); or equivalent combination of education and experience.
Ability to read and comprehend simple instructions, short correspondence, and memos.
Ability to write simple correspondence.
Ability to respond to common inquiries or complaints from customers, regulatory agencies, or members of the business community.
Ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide in all units of measure, using whole numbers, common fractions, and decimals and ability to perform these operations using units of American money and weight measurement, volume, and distance.
Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out detailed but uninvolved written or oral instructions.
Ability to deal with problems involving a few concrete variables in standardized situations.
The physical demands described below are representative of those that must be met by an individual to successfully perform the essential functions of the Event Guide job.

While performing the duties of this job, the individual is required to:

Regularly (2/3 of the time or more) stand for prolonged periods; walk for prolonged periods (including ability to walk at a given pace that is predetermined by a moving sidewalk); talk; hear audible alarms, voice commands with background noise; use hands and fingers to grip, pinch, handle or feel objects, tools or controls; balance; reach, pull, push with hands and arms below head; repeat motions more than twice per minute; lift up to 25-50 pounds with control; push up to 50-100 pounds with control; use close vision with or without corrective lens (clear vision at 20 inches or less); use distance vision with or without corrective lens (clear vision at 20 feet or more); use peripheral vision (ability to observe an area that can be seen up and down or to the left and right while eyes are fixed on a given point); depth perception (vision, ability to judge distances and spatial relationships); adjust focus (ability to adjust the eye to bring an object into sharp focus while in changing light conditions e.g., sunshine to indoor or dark conditions); work in varied light conditions including low or diminished lighting; maintain alertness and attentiveness up to 4 hours while working varying hours; maintain concentration/focus (e.g., ability to interpret the work environment and make decisions on predetermined operating policies and procedure); use their ability to smell.
Frequently (1/3 to 2/3 of the time) stoop, kneel, crouch or crawl; reach, pull, push with hands and arms above head; work in an environment with flashing lights including strobe lamps.
Occasionally (1/3 of the time or less) work in an environment subject to vibrations; climb stairs / ladders; repetition-using an input device-a keyboard or mouse-in a steady manner; work in small or tight spaces; work in confined spaces i.e. manholes or work pits.
The work environment characteristics described below are representative of those an individual encounters while performing the essential functions of the Event Guide job.

While performing the duties of this job, the individual is required to:

Regularly (2/3 of the time or more) work in wet, humid conditions (non-weather); work in outdoor weather conditions to include direct sunlight, heat or cold; work in extreme cold (non-weather); work in extreme heat (non-weather).
Frequently (1/3 to 2/3 of the time) use an extendable boom forklift (lull); use a forklift (sit down).
Occasionally (1/3 of the time or less) work with oils/fuels; work with toxic or caustic chemicals, hazardous chemicals, fluorescent lamps or batteries; work with aerosols (spray paints, brake cleaner); be exposed to bodily fluids (blood, vomit); transport fuels or compressed gases; use a motorized company vehicle or a leased or personal vehicle for company business; work on water attractions or yachts.
While performing the duties of this job, the noise level in the work environment is loud (examples: noise when raised conversation is needed).
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Tengku Ira

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Re: Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

Post by Ameerul on Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:37 pm

Hey guys. After doing few Research regarding on how to organise a concert i've provide few step guideline for all of us:

Step 1
Arrange for and manage artist booking and contract negotiations. Contact management agencies that represent the artist. Attend to every aspect of the contract, which includes artist payment, production requirements and contract riders, backstage accommodations, food, drink and other artist expectations.

Step 2
Contract a venue. A concert promoter negotiates an artist's contract while negotiating the appropriate venue. Book a concert hall that matches expected ticket sales. Negotiate, for example, a larger venue for a major rock band than for a stand-up comedian. Research the size of the audience the talent will attract. The appropriate venue may be a 20,000-seat arena, a field or a nightclub. Each site will have individual demands.

Step 3
Schedule sufficient time before a booked date to allow for ample advertising and preparations. A concert promotion company, i recommends beginning 14 weeks before the date to begin advertising, arranging ticket sales and ticket printing. Concert promoters handle ticket sales and payments to the artist, venue and merchandisers.

Step 4
Advertise the event. Evaluate the amount and type of advertising that meets the event's needs. Large concerts, for example, often require a media blitz. Advertise in sufficient time before the concert date. Concert promoters must calculate an ad budget and do advertising placement that will drive ticket sales to turn a profit from the event. Advertising may include TV, radio, newspaper and online placement.

Step 5
Attend to production and audience details. The artist or the venue (the house) will provide sound and lighting staff. The website Creative Concert Promoters cautions concert promoters to make sure that concessions and restrooms meet the audience's needs at the particular event.
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Re: Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

Post by Danial Aiman on Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:50 pm

That's a great information right there,
but we should put the do's and dont's during our festival so we can prevent bad things from happening. maybe we could put these do's and dont's on our website:

1. Do… make your campsite decor fun and functional.
Don’t… bring anything irreplaceable that you couldn’t bear to lose.

2. Do… make friends with event staff — they will show you the way.
Don’t… be rude and forget to say heyyyy to the horses.

3. Do… pack a small camping stove or grill to make food.
Don’t… light the propane stove if it’s making a weird noise.

4. Do… bring a pop-up tent.
Don’t… assume your pop-up tent has super powers and will keep your coolers ice cold. Check coolers regularly to make sure the ice hasn’t melted.

5. Do… accessorize even when you’re roughing it.
Don’t… forget to bring lots of wet wipes to get rid of the dirt and sweat that will crud up your accessories.

6. Do… wear comfy shoes OR get a ride to and from the campsite to the fest.
Don’t… make the mistake of having to trek a mile to and from the campsite in heels. You’ll regret it.

7. Do… use tarps to block harsh elements like wind, dirt and sun.
Don’t… assume you have enough tarps. More tarps are always welcome!

8. Do… opt for solar powered lights to supplement battery powered lights.
Don’t… forget to charge solar lights in the sun ahead of the event.

9. Do… meet your camping neighbors.
Don’t… lower your romance standards just because you’re at a festival.

10. Do… enjoy the beautiful outdoor scenery.
Don’t… get caught off guard by the dust in the air, especially at festivals in the desert or during the summer. Protect your lungs with a bandana tied around your nose and mouth or a half-face respirator.

here's what i found a great do's and dont's for our guest of the festival Cool Cool
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Re: Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

Post by Tengku Ira on Sat Oct 31, 2015 3:13 pm

Here is another sharing,
Event Operations Planning
Chapter 5: Event Operations Planning

IT IS A PDF FILE EVERYONE. A bit exhaustive Wink Good luck
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Re: Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

Post by shafiqa on Sat Oct 31, 2015 11:03 pm

hi everyone.as all you know, i as a financial manager so here some information that i found and want to share with you. it is a strategies for our company to improve our profit.

Once you have identified and measured your key profit drivers, you should develop strategies to grow them, without increasing costs. Making your business more profitable involves looking at ways to increase sales revenue as well as decreasing your costs and benchmarking your business to see where you can save money.

You should also prioritise the strategies you've chosen to improve your profit so you can focus on the most important ones.

Strategies to increase sales revenue
Increase productivity of your staff - recognise and reward staff contributions with staff performance reviews, and teach them sales skills and how to upsell products so customers make multiple purchases at one time
Develop new product lines - survey your customers about new products
Find new customers - new customers can help grow your business
Find new markets - use market research to determine if you could expand your business into new areas
Customer service - improve your customer service and develop a staff training program
Increase your prices - check if you have priced your goods and services correctly and if you could increase prices without reducing sales
Price discounts - consider price discounts and promotions to increase your customer base (e.g. 2-for-1 deals or happy hour)
Retail displays - use effective retail displays to increase your sales
Strategies to decrease costs
Decrease inventory - stock control is a good way to streamline your business
Decrease direct costs - make sure you have the right suppliers for your business and negotiate for better prices or discounts for buying in bulk
Decrease indirect costs - for example, try to minimise waste and errors in your business by training staff, or reduce marketing costs by using low-cost marketing techniques
Decrease overheads - for example, save energy wherever possible or try find a cheaper energy supply company
Benchmark key financials - benchmarking your business helps you compare your costs (like rent and utilities etc.) to similar businesses in your industry to see if you are paying too much
Prioritise your strategies
Once you have chosen strategies to make your business more profitable, you should prioritise them in order of importance. It's a good idea to write down your goals and the corresponding strategies to achieve them, and also how you plan to implement your strategies.

Focus on your more profitable items
Your products or services with the highest gross profit margin are the most important to your business, as they generate more money. Once you have identified your most profitable items you should concentrate on achieving higher sales targets for them. This may require you to rethink aspects of your business or to devise strategies for improvement. Consider using a business adviser to help you.
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Re: Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

Post by Ameerul on Tue Dec 08, 2015 11:46 pm

8 Marketing Tips to Sell More Tickets
1. Start Early
Whatever date we plan to begin selling  our tickets, begin a week or two before that. In fact, announce two separate dates when the tickets will be going on sale. The first will be an early bird special and should be exclusive to subscribers or customers with a membership. A discount should also be included during the early bird sale. The second date is when tickets become available for everyone else at retail price.
The early bird special and discount can also be used as an incentive to encourage customers to sign up for a membership program. Make the announcement on  our social media feeds as well as on the main social network page for  our event. Include a huge clickable “sign up” icon with a crafty call-to-action.
2. Sell Next Event’s Tickets During Current Event
If we host events on a regular basis, then use  our event to begin selling tickets for the next one. Make the announcement before the event comes to a close and offer a discount as a reward for attending the current event. Make it known that the discount is only in effect if purchased before the end of the event.
We can sell the tickets in person by setting up a booth and designating a few staff members to sell hardcopy tickets. Better yet, if we incorporated an event app for  our event, then include a customised function that allows attendees to easily order their tickets through their mobile. Speaking of apps, a service like Azavista enables organizers to incorporate a native event app into their conference for easy guest registration and data analytics.
3. Promote the Location of the Event
What are some of the nearby attractions within a cab drive distance of the venue? Are there notable landmarks worthy as a backdrop for a selfie? If  our event includes attendees from other cities, states, or countries, then they might be interested in stopping by these locations. If there are popular restaurants, bars, or clubs nearby, have a few staff members take a selfie or two at these locations and use the pics for promoting the event as a whole.
Here’s an example of promoting  our event while mentioning the area:
Our event is located within a stone’s throw of San Francisco Pier where we’ll be able to take in the breathtaking site of the beautiful coast. While we’re here, stop by Luigi’s Ice Cream for a delicate treat that has become a local favorite for over 50 years.
Why should we promote the area? For one thing, promoting nearby businesses and attractions is a selfless thing to do. Secondly, it gives attendees some site seeing benefits that adds to their overall experience and impression of  our event.
4. Start a Contest
Ticket sales skyrocket tenfold if  our staffers get involved. Have them use their own social media channels to spread word of the event. Make their efforts worthwhile by making it into a contest. Provide an incentive for those whose referrals lead to X amount of sales. The incentive can be as small as a gift card or as extravagant as a paid vacation depending on how big  our budget is.
Similarly, we can also promote a group effort and offer an incentive for the whole group if everyone’s collective efforts lead to X tickets being sold. The incentive can be an office party with full catering or a bonus in everyone’s next paycheck.
5. Make  our Event Just as Fun as It Is Educational
Sure, most people will be attending  our event to hear a guest lecturer or learn something that will benefit them in some area of their lives. However, adding a bit of entertainment value wouldn’t hurt either. Perhaps after the lectures and workshops, we can incorporate an after-party where cocktails are served.
The entertainment can include a number of activities, such as:

  • Techno dance party
  • Karaoke hour
  • Performance from a local performer, such as a musician, comedian, or dancer

Why do we need to promote the fun stuff? While the main attendees are attending for the educational content, remember that most of them will likely be bringing along spouses, children, and friends. These people are the secondary attendees and would not attend  our type of event on their own. By promoting the entertainment aspect of the event, we can appeal to this demographic.
6. Hype the Event With “Mini Events”
Create some sort of countdown where each day includes a “mini event” that helps build up anticipation for the upcoming event. The concept is similar to the whole “12 days of Christmas” scheme where children create a chain out of construction paper and remove a link as each day passes to commemorate being one day closer to Christmas.
Here’s an example of what we can add for each countdown:

  • Day 5: live webinar
  • Day 4: social media contest with ticket giveaways
  • Day 3: video testimonial featuring attendees from the last event.
  • Day 2: guest blog post from one of the event’s guest speakers
  • Day 1: a “see we there” video message

 our countdown should start at least 10 days before, though the example above provides some ideas of what we can incorporate. The end of every mini event should include a call-to-action encouraging followers to buy their ticket if they haven’t already done so.
7. Get  our Sponsors Involved
A big turnout would benefit  our sponsors just as much as it would benefit we. This is why we should encourage them to get involved and promote the event using their own social media outlets.  our sponsors are likely more well established than we are, hence why they have the budget to fund  our event. As such, they also likely have a larger connection base.
While the bulk of the promotion is  our responsibility, don’t be afraid to ask  our sponsors to promote the event by linking to  our ticket sales page.
8. Create Different Ticket Options and Packages
This is a good option if  our event is held over the course of several days. There will be members who may decline to attend due to not being able to attend the whole event. For this reason, create different ticket types to accommodate those who may only be able to show up for part of the event. We can, for example, have the regular ticket that’s good for the whole event and another that’s good for just the first day or two. The latter, of course, should be sold at a cheaper price.
We can also do the same if the event includes an after-party. We can keep that part of the event separate from the educational workshops and conferences that come before. Create ticket options that are good for both events, good for workshops only, and good for the after-party only.
Selling Tickets Is all in a Day’s Business
Selling tickets really isn’t hard work at all. We just have to make it really worthwhile for guests to attend and market the hell out of the event. If all the steps are in place, then there really isn’t any reason why tickets shouldn’t sell like hotcakes.
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Re: Knowledge Sharing (event improvisation)

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